Whirlpool Gas Dryer Troubleshooting

Whirlpool Gas Dryer Troubleshooting From linens to clothes, Whirlpool dryers can freshen up your laundry in no time. If your machine experiences a rare hiccup along the way, don’t let your hamper pile up as a result. Our Whirlpool gas dryer troubleshooting guide below will help you diagnose and resolve the problem quickly.

Whirlpool Gas Dryer Troubleshooting Solutions

Overlapping Issues

Below are a few causes that overlap with these issues:

  • Poor incoming power – Unplug the unit and plug the cord into another outlet to check for proper power flow.
  • Main control board is broken – Check all the other issues outlined in this guide first. If all of these are functioning properly, the board needs to be replaced.
  • Timer is broken – Check the other problem in this guide first. If they all are working correctly, the timer needs to be replaced.

Dryer Won’t Heat

When the dryer doesn’t heat properly, look for the following potential issues:

  • Heating element or assembly is burned out – This requires a multimeter to test the heating element or assembly’s continuity. If the element or assembly doesn’t have continuity, replace it.
  • Thermal fuse is blown out – Overheating can cause the fuse to blow out or a broken electrical path. Also, make sure the exhaust vent from the dryer to the outside isn’t restricted to prevent overheating.
  • Gas valve solenoid is broken – To see if the gas valve solenoid is faulty, check the dryer’s igniter. If the igniter glows, goes out and doesn’t ignite, then the solenoid or multiple ones need to be replaced.
  • Igniter isn’t heating – This requires a multimeter to test the igniter’s continuity. If the igniter doesn’t have continuity, this means it burned out and needs to be replaced.
  • Flame sensor is broken – See if the thermal fuse or igniter are the main culprit. If neither are broken, then the flame sensor has burned out. Use a multimeter to test the flame sensor’s continuity at room temperature. If there isn’t continuity, replace the sensor.
  • High-limit or cycling thermostat is broken – The previous issues typically cause both the high-limit and cycling thermostat to work incorrectly. If you test the other components and there aren’t issues, use a multimeter to test either thermostat for continuity. If the thermostat doesn’t have continuity, replace it.

Dryer Overheats

When the dryer is overheating during operation, check for these possible issues:

  • Heating element or assembly has shorted out – A shorted heating element or its assembly can cause overheating. Use a multimeter to test the heating element or assembly’s continuity. If the element or assembly doesn’t have continuity, replace either one.
  • Air flow is restricted – Restricted air flow from the vent can cause overheating. Clean the vent at least once a year to prevent partial clogging or a large obstruction.
  • Cycling thermostat is broken – If you test the other components and don’t notice issues, use a multimeter to test the cycling thermostat for continuity. If the thermostat doesn’t have continuity, replace it.
  • Drum seal is broken – If the felt seal is gone or worn out, the heat will go through the drum and overheat the unit. It will need to be replaced.
  • Blower wheel is obstructed or broken – If dryer vent has week air flow, look for blockages in the blower wheel. If there aren’t obstructions, rotate the blower wheel by hand with the machine off. If the wheel is wobbly, it needs to be replaced.

Dryer Won’t Start

If the dryer isn’t starting up, look for the following:

  • Start switch is broken – Check if the start switch is broken by starting the dryer. If it hums but doesn’t start, the start switch is okay. If it doesn’t start or makes a noise, you’ll need to test continuity with a multimeter. Replace it if there is no continuity.

  • Door switch is broken – See if the door switch is working by starting the dryer. If you hear a clicking sound from the switch, it’s working. If there isn’t a click, use a multimeter to check for continuity. If the switch doesn’t have continuity, it will need to be replaced.
  • Thermal fuse is blown out – Overheating can cause the fuse to blow out or a broken electrical path. Also, make sure the exhaust vent from the dryer to the outside isn’t restricted to prevent overheating.
  • Drive motor is broken – Start by checking the three components in the bullets above first. If those aren’t faulty and you hear a humming sound, remove the motor belt and see if there is something blocking the blower wheel. If everything is clear, then the motor is broken and needs to be replaced.
  • Drive belt is broken – Some Whirlpool dryer models have a switch that turns off power to the unit if the drive belt is broken. If you notice damage on the belt, it needs to be replaced.
  • Belt switch is broken – If you hear a humming sound during startup, the belt switch is okay. If not, see if your dryer model has a belt switch. Test the switch for continuity using a multimeter. If there isn’t continuity, it needs to be replaced.

Dryer Won’t Stop or Takes Too Long

If the dryer isn’t stopping or is taking too long, below are potential causes:

  • Air flow is restricted – Restricted air flow from the vent can increase drying time. Clean the vent at least once a year to prevent partial clogging or a large obstruction.
  • Blower wheel is obstructed or broken – If dryer vent has week air flow, look for blockages in the blower wheel. If there aren’t obstructions, rotate the blower wheel by hand with the machine off. If the wheel is wobbly, it needs to be replaced.
  • Gas valve solenoid is broken – To see if the gas valve solenoid is faulty, check the dryer’s igniter. If the igniter glows, goes out and doesn’t ignite, then the solenoid or multiple ones need to be replaced.
  • Heating element or assembly is broken – A broken heating element or heating element assembly can keep the dryer running too long. Use a multimeter to test the heating element or assembly’s continuity. If the element or assembly doesn’t have continuity, replace either one.
  • Lint filter is clogged – Fabric softener or dryer sheets can cause a lint buildup. This might make the dryer run longer than it should. Prevent this issue by cleaning the lint filter frequently.
  • Faulty moisture sensor – A faulty sensor causes inaccurate reporting, telling the dryer that items are moist and increasing drying time. The sensor needs to be replaced.
  • High-limit or cycling thermostat is broken – If either of these is defective, it causes the drying process to take longer than usual. Use a multimeter to test either thermostat for continuity. If the either thermostat doesn’t have continuity, it needs to be replaced.
  • Faulty thermistor – The thermistor monitors the temperature and cycle the heat on and off. If broken, the heat might not cycle on and hinder the drying process. It will need to be replaced.

Dryer Drum Won’t Turn or Stops Spinning

If the dryer drum isn’t turning or has stopped spinning, here are possible issues causing it:

  • Drive belt is broken – See if the belt is broken by reaching into the dryer and turning the drum by hand. If it spins very easily or loosely, the belt is broken. Check for wear and damage on the belt as well before replacing it.
  • Worn out roller(s) – Check if the rollers are worn out by removing the drive belt and turn the drum by hand. If it’s not moving freely, the rollers likely are worn out and need to be replaced. Even if only one has noticeable wear, consider replacing all at once.
  • Roller axle is broken – Look for wear or binding on the rollers. Test it by removing the drive belt and turning the drum by hand. If it’s wobbly or not moving freely, the axles and rollers need to be replaced.
  • Bearing or support bearing is worn out – Check for a worn out bearing or support bearing by removing the drive belt and turning the drum by hand. If the drum makes a grinding or squeaking noise, the bearing needs to be replaced.
  • Idler pulley is defective – See if the idler pulley for the dryer drum belt is spinning freely on the shaft. If you notice that the pulley is worn or stuck, replace both the pulley and belt.
  • Glides are worn out – Worn out glides can bind the drum and overwork the motor, keeping the drum from turning. If there is significant wear on even just one, replace them all for proper operation.
  • Drive motor is faulty – If you test all the potential issues above and notice the blower wheel isn’t obstructed, the drive motor is likely failing. It will need to be replaced.
  • Control board is defective – A defective dryness control board could cause the machine to stop spinning before items are dry. If you check the previous bullets first and they pass troubleshooting, then the board needs to be replaced.

Dryer is Noisy

If you hear uncommon sounds from the dryer, look for the following:

  • Drive belt is damaged – Wear on the drive belt can create noises when the dryer turns. The belt will need to be replaced.
  • Drum rollers are worn out – Check if the rollers are worn out by removing the drive belt and turn the drum by hand. If it’s not moving freely, the rollers likely are worn out and need to be replaced. Even if only one has noticeable wear, consider replacing all at once.

  • Roller axle is broken – Look for wear or binding on the rollers. Test it by removing the drive belt and turning the drum by hand. If it’s wobbly or not moving freely, the axles and rollers need to be replaced.
  • Blower wheel has a worn sleeve – The blower when might have a sleeve that is worn out, causing the blower wheel to shake on the motor shaft. The sleeve will need to be replaced.
  • Blower wheel is obstructed or broken – If dryer vent has week air flow, look for blockages in the blower wheel. If there aren’t obstructions, rotate the blower wheel by hand with the machine off. If the wheel is wobbly, it needs to be replaced.
  • Bearing or support bearing is worn out – Check for a worn out bearing or support bearing by removing the drive belt and turning the drum by hand. If the drum makes a grinding or squeaking noise, the bearing needs to be replaced.
  • Glides are worn out – Worn out glides can bind the drum and overwork the motor, keeping the drum from turning. If there is significant wear on even just one, you’ll hear an audible sound. Replace them all for proper operation.
  • Idler pulley or assembly is worn out – Check if the idler pulley damaged or worn out. If you notice that the pulley is worn or stuck, replace both the pulley and drive belt. If the assembly also is worn out, that will need to be replaced too.
  • Drive motor is faulty – If you test all the potential issues above, the drive motor is likely failing. It will need to be replaced.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *